Episode #
033

Protecting your Health with Dr. Juliana Jernigan, MD, MPH, MBA, DTM&H | TNN33

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Episode Summary

Health and safety should always remain your number one priority when traveling, no matter where you go. We all know that traveling will never be the same as before due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Your idea of traveling might be different now but this doesn’t mean that it has to be less fun. You just have to make the most out of your vacation while ensuring health practices and keeping in mind the things you should be aware of for safe travel. Safety also means that you have protection against unforeseen circumstances - travel insurance. And that’s where Juliana Jernigan from Insured Nomads comes in.


Andrew Jernigan and Allen Koski, together with Juliana, talked about how important it is to secure your health and safety while traveling. Taking care of yourself, and sometimes your family, should always be one of the most important things when traveling, especially abroad. This episode is both endearing and educating - surely you don’t want to miss any part of it.

From the episode

Juliana on social media

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What You'll Learn

Take care of your mental health. Invest in it for yourself and your family members if you have children.

Having the protection in place for medically necessary evacuation is essential.

Make sure you have prescriptions and supplements you need, and if you can enter the country you are going to with them in your luggage as some are restricted in some locations.

Timestamps

[4:21] Things To Keep in Mind While Traveling: Resilience and Humility

[6:28] Planning Could Save You From a Lot of Headache

[13:25] The Responsibility of Employers to Their Employees

[16:49] The Effects of Traveling on Children

[21:42] Keeping Yourself Mentally Healthy

[26:54] Telemedicine and Its Importance Today

Show Transcript

Allen  

Welcome to The New Nomad podcast. We have an extremely interesting guest today, a doctor, but also somebody who's very close to our hearts. Juliana Jernigan of Insured Nomads will be joining us today. And if the last name doesn't tip you off, I'll bring in my co host, Andrew Jernigan. Today, Andrew, it one of the really interesting things that in my conversations with Juliana, and I've, obviously, you've travelled continents and countries together, is you and your family. I tip my hat to you because of the amount of resilience. You've raised family, in multiple countries, different languages, different cultures. I think it's gonna be a really interesting conversation today. And maybe you could share a couple of the things that you have learned before we bring in our guests, Juliana, from her about, you know, family, keeping people safe, secure, healthy, etc.

Andrew  

Hi, everyone. Thanks for tuning in with us again this week. This is a special episode for me having my wife and co founder on board with us for this episode. So it's it's a fun one for me. Yes, talking thinking about resilience, I first pendulum swing to the fact that you can't assume that resilience will be the result of going from country to country. Many times I think it's it's that assumption of Oh, kids are so resilient, or adults are so resilient once once you do this, you just build up these, these layers of armor that just protect you. And yes, the globally mobile do but have another layer of resilience that comes in, but it takes a really proactive stance to wear that armor well. And at times, you still realize their gaps in that armor.

Allen  

It's really interesting, because, you know, the things I hear about people that are very successful through different cultures and different life events is people knowing with resilience, but people who are adventurous and intellectually curious. And I put both of you in that area. And I think that that's really an important attribute. And I think that third culture, kids pick this up too, as they, you know, travel through different areas. So it's really interesting, and I'll bring Juliana and I just want to mention to the audience a couple things about Juliana. She was raised in Brazil, but has lived in four continents, has supported Travel Medicine, global health, etc. But very interestingly, fought a cholera epidemic without electricity, worked on pandemic response plan. So, so many of you who have reached out to us and said, Listen, we would love to have a doctor or a medical professional on your podcast, help us with some ideas of, you know, how we prepare before we land somewhere, once we land somewhere, I think we're gonna have a perfect guest today. So Juliana, welcome to The New Nomad podcast. love to have you aboard. So maybe before we talk about the details of what to do before you go what to do when you're there, you know, some of maybe your journey as you've as you've travelled, you know, what have you learned, you know, globally about yourself that I think others would appreciate it and maybe what can can help them through what is a really interesting adventures.

Juliana  

Ah, thank you, Allen. It's great to be here. Thank you for inviting me. You started with a big question. I'm a big one. Yes. You went? Yes.

Allen  

Yes, we do. Yeah.

Juliana  

Um, so I think, you know, we all agree and I think, you know, our listeners, if you're listening to us, you're probably the same tribe in that we've come to understand that traveling is an investment, right? It is an investment in us, in our families. And we, we have an amazing opportunity, unique opportunity to grow and be expanded. And I think resilience comes in as one of the, the key words you know, you're building, I'd like to compare resilience with, you know, you're building muscle, right? You're, you're, you're getting stronger to resist, you know, the, you know, the storms of life that will come your way. But, you know, I will add, you mentioned a few attributes that are necessary to build resilience, and I would add another attribute that is necessary, if you want to be a good global citizen. And that is, you know, you just have to be humble. I think one thing travel has done for me is to really teach me to be curious and to be, always be ready to learn. I'm not the I don't have all the answers. And once you realize that is really, really freeing, right? It's very, very freeing. And I think, everywhere you go, when everyone you learn, you meet, it's an opportunity for you to, you know, what's your open mind is but to grow, you know, and expand that box. So

Allen  

That's great. Well, I mean, obviously, it's really difficult for some of the people that we've dealt with on this, this podcast, and they've said to us, and we answer the question, what got you excited about traveling to this other country or just packing up or moving and experiencing something different? And they, and they'll always answer like, well, you know, it had good Wi Fi there, I would learn to surf, I could find housing. But very rarely, we've had somebody say, until they've run into a problem. I never thought about checking out the medical facilities. I never thought about checking to make sure I could get a prescription refilled. That usually comes later when they've run into an issue. So I would love you to share with folks some of your ideas on what should you do before you go. So if you're packing up, and you're going off to another country, some of the tips and ideas as you guys have moved for different locations around the world.

Allen  

That, okay, so we do have, you know, of course, the reason why we're going will vary depending on you know, the trip, and yeah, there's so many variables there. But one thing I've learned that is just commonplace, no matter how long or how short the trip or the travel is, is really plan well. And even for those people who are very spontaneous, and don't like to plan and don't like to spend time looking at all the possibilities, I would recommend, you know, some basic risk management. It is, it will save you a ton of headache. You know, once you get to your destination, even maybe when you come back, and one of the things I highly recommend. And I see a lot of professional global citizens, you know, do that, and I see a lot of corporations they've understood this a long time ago, is invest in a travel health consultation. So we have expert specialists in the medical field, you know, people who actually study, you know, all the different health threats and risk the safety threats around the world. And they are more than qualified to look at you not just look at the destination where you're going and tell you the risks there. But also look at your health profile and assess your risks, you know, how is your dental health included in this package, you know, but also, you know, what is the risk of you actually needing to have emergency surgery, you know, and things like that. 

Juliana  

So it really, really pays off, not to mention immunizations, you know, there are so many and I think we've been more than it we've been all made aware of how important immunization can be, especially in a pandemic scenario, but you know, there are many endemic diseases that are preventable with vaccines, and we have safe vaccines out there, you know, so absolutely worth the investment and the time you know, to do that consultation, but also you did mention the travel kit, right and I would like to just say yes because you know, yeah, there are some practical steps that if even before you start packing you know you can start thinking about it so I always tell people you know, if you take medications you know, regular medications have extra to take with you so if you're staying 236 12 months, try to have more than enough with you for that length of the trip. Whenever it's possible. Sometimes it is not but if it is please do that. In you know, again, the key word is plan right so if you are glasses have have an extra pair with you in and other than that, you know what, let's look at the last year what were the medications you use, you know over the counter so ibuprofen acetaminophen antishistamine. So if you have a history of allergic reactions, and even if you don't, it is safe to have it is good to have antihistamines for allergies but also you know topicals so, some lotions for you know mosquito bites or some something that can give you an allergic reaction, antacid medicine, anti nausea, you know, or motion sickness medicine We all very familiar with antibacterial, you know, hand wipes and in this sort of thing, but I always recommend as well you know, to have your first aid kit. So bandages just a basic supply there we find in a good first aid kit, you know, including plastic wraps, you know, gauze tape, scissors with rubber tips, you know, just to cut just that first basic first aid. You will be, you know, glad that you have it. I always think with me will sign sounds silly, but it is one of my hacks is like I like to take safety pins, I find the safety pins work magic. When you're, you're travelling, you know, but, you know, diarrhoea medicine so I'm not talking about antibiotics, but I'm talking about now just over the counter diarrhoea medicine. If you are prone to have diarrhoea and you would like to have antibiotics, definitely this is something you can discuss with your travel medicine physician, you know, neither than that. Never, never go anywhere without your sunscreen. And depending on where you're going insect repellent, it is a must. 

Allen  

Yes. Yeah. Well, yeah, you brought up some interesting on the on the on the kit also and you actually brought it to my attention? Is there people who use things like CBD oil. In some countries, that might be an issue or I also had people that go to Singapore have trouble with you know, they have a prescription for Ritalin? So part a part of that research, I guess Juliana would be also checking in to make sure your prescriptions can be refilled there or not illegal? Am I on the right track? That that is a great point. And absolutely. So if you take you mentioned CBD, which you know, in the US just become common, very common use. But most places in the world, CBD is still considered illegal and an illegal substance. And just like CBD, we have many other especially opioids, who are considered illegal substances, depending on the country we go. So yes, it is very important to do your homework, do your research to find out you know, what you can actually carry with you across across that border? And what kind of medicine are you going to be able to refill your prescription there? And then if you find out that there is not a, you know, a refill, and there's no way to get the medicine there, one more reason for you to have a plan B, right? So you go you go with an alternative.

So it's interesting, I'll bring Andrew in the conversation, Andrew ran a medical clinic in Ghana. And you brought to my attention also that that I understand that both of you tried to get some sort of health care evacuation coverage when you were overseas. And there was there was some issue there on that and obviously you're very passionate. One of the reasons why you've you founded Insured Nomads is protecting people. Passionate about people also making sure that they buy either a travel medical program or a individual personal medical program, you know, what would you like to add to Juliana's comments here?

Andrew  

Well, duty of care, which may be a new new term for some listeners, but that's that piece of the responsibility that sometimes when you're sent by an employer, the employer has a duty of care to that person. You know, more than just medical, but making sure their well being is, is protected. And that can't be done if they can't be backed out easily. For natural disaster, if they can't be, you know, a response can't be made with boots on the ground promptly. And an easy way for people to check in. That's not just an email or a phone call an easy way to track not as a spy Big Brother, but as in there's an incident that happened, where they close to it and getting in touch with him from the alarm centre. And that was something that really has been a passion of mine as you as you mentioned, just from the start from when some 20 years ago, we first made our trip first vision trip to Ghana and then relocated there for for a number of years. Remember, we ran into a crisis response Firm A couple of guys in a one of the large cities and said you know, can we get it? They said absolutely not. You know, we started the oil and gas companies we serve the mining companies, you can't afford us. And it turned out that you know, our our $1,000 a month or something health plan didn't provide any of that and we couldn't afford it with a million or so budget that we were working from at the time. And it was, it was kind of it was very sad for us realising that we're off the map, off the grid with black mambas, you name it. And we're not getting back out of there. Yeah, with kids that were running around barefoot, with scorpions the size of a small lobster, you know, that just and yeah, black mambas  hanging out of the trees that could bite you and you'd be dead in 30 minutes. Luckily, we made it through those years. And, but those were, that was fuel for us to realise. Okay. Protections got to go beyond the policy. And, and that's some of the impetus here, I hear some of the things that, that she said there, and I'm just my mind goes through the years of, you know, and, wow, I'm glad I'm glad I've got her at my side. Because yes, we did move to Ghana with with our essential oils, and, you know, different things. But, guys, you got to plan ahead, for sure. And then be intentional all through the process.

Allen  

And I really, you know, I commend you, because you raised children that are very multicultural. Maybe Juliana some some tips there, because we've had some guests on about Third Culture, kids, and your perspective on how people respond differently to culture on that. But also, you know, we've had a lot of conversations about the difficulty of parents and children's, from a mental health perspective, because there are certain stresses that are quite a bit different. When you're living in an unfamiliar atmosphere.

Andrew  

Absolutely, yes. And I am very passionate about this topic, just because we've lived it, and we still do it. And it is part of, you know, it has become part of our identity, really, you know, as we moved around, and, you know, we have three kids, and they are completely different from each other, as they should be. And matter of fact, you know, they react completely different to the change, to the transitions, to the places where we've been the cultures where we, you know, relocated in and, or to and in. Yes, you know, mental health became a huge deal in our household. And he already was, but you know, especially in the last few years, as they became teens, and we, we've had to process, you know, all the the change, and all the moves, and some great conversations came out of this, you know. And I would be lying to you, if I, you know, if I were to say I have all the answers, and we figured it out, and we know how to do it now.

Juliana  

I think we've all grew a lot as a family. And we've had lots of incredible, incredible experiences as a family, but also really a lot of tears, a lot of pain. It is especially hard for, for kids to, you know, leave friends behind. So this is one of the aspects and of course, you've had great guests here talking about TCKs and Ruth was one of them. I highly recommend, you know, her book about TCKs, you know. I mean, we've, we've went back, we've gone back to that book over and over and over, because, you know, we, we have learned that there is not a recipe, right? There is not one recipe and it really takes a lot of a lot of dialogue. A lot of keeping up family traditions, you know, they're special to, to the family, and making sure no matter how hard you may be, you may have to get really creative, but it's worth it to keep those traditions alive. But also, you know, try to have fun together. And, you know, is sounds very easy and very, you know, of course that's a no brainer, but you know, when you're going through culture shock, and you're when you're going through culture shock as a family together, you know, they're all we're all experiencing really strong emotions, you know. We're all grieving at some level what you left behind what, you know, the new reality is and you're all finding out, you know, the joys of your new life, but you're finding out at different times, often so, you know, it can be quite annoying to see someone else super excited about something you don't see the point off, you know.
  

So, you know, it's really important to give each other grace, in this, you know, in this journey, it is a journey. And I've had a conversation recently, I think it was last week with my middle child, you know, when she's 16 now, and we're still talking about him processing things that we went through when she was 6,7,8. So, you know, he definitely, it's a very rich experience, and I highly recommend it. But I also recommend, you know, don't underestimate the power of actually dialogue, you know, and allowing feelings to be expressed, there is no small feeling. All feelings are feelings, and they need to be, you know, not just felt but expressed as well. And every kid's maybe, sorry, go ahead.

Allen  

Well, I was just gonna say in this may be one of the reasons why is I've gotten to know Andrew, and he was very insistent that in our programs, that we made sure that there is mental health support available, folks, as you've seen people out there. And I know in the individual space, that's not typical. And this is what I think so great about what your learnings are, as you've always said that, you know, to talk about it to draw people out. Andrew I love your comments on this, because this is an area that I know you and Juliana very passionate because you've seen global people not get the support, you know, to talk it out, so to speak, maybe in a professional setting. But you made sure that this was something that was in the programs that you built.

Juliana  

Yes, you know, and as I, as we broach this mental health topic, it's it's something that that is so close to my heart, as I have faced, you know, depression, on the field on an international assignment. And you know, it's not anything you can write home about, because everyone expects that you're having the greatest time living it, living it up in some adventure. And yes, you do have the adventures, you know, loading that roof rack of your truck with and covering it with a mosquito net, I mean, with a fishing net, and strapping it down, doing that day after day. And you just think, Man, I wish somebody to take a picture of me because this is surreal. You know, just because you think I'm living this life. But yet the flip side is, oftentimes you are isolated, you do go through relational issues, and you need that support system behind you to where you can talk to a counsellor, or your kids are going through something and they need to be able to talk to a psychologist, psychiatrist, someone. And also the debriefing after leaving international assignment, many times relocation providers, you know, if you have Caritas, or are one of the big ones, there's a there's a little bit of a debriefing, and there's some a workshop that the employer provides that searching out someone to help you process the change. Because those that you're jumping back into the next society, whether it's your original home environment, or the or the next assignment, those around, you don't know what you've been through. And so it's it's just so vital to take care of your mental health during this. 

Juliana  

Yeah

Allen  

Something that was incredible, because we've gotten a lot of feedback that people come back from their overseas assignments at a corporation, and they leave within a couple of years. And a lot of the studies indicate somebody comes back after two years of this incredibly impactful assignment. And I've actually had expats say to me, nobody even asked me how it was, or, you know, share some stories with us. It's just like, welcome back to your office. And, and it was an issue of depression. And Julia, Juliana you're gonna say something along those lines of Sure. I'll turn it over to you on the mental health aspect, but not asking somebody to share their experiences is really difficult for people who this might have been the most formative experience of their life.

Juliana  

Exactly. And just before I move forward, Andrew said something about you know, we can't share if you're depressed, you can't share with people back home, who are expecting you to, you know, have it all figured out. And actually, I would say so much has changed in the last few, last decade. And today, I think we would approach it differently. I think we do we all have a responsibility right to shatter, to destroy the taboo that is associated with mental health. And I think the world has come a long way in actually looking at mental health with different eyes. But you mentioned you know, about the the solitude and actually not being able to relate when you come back, you are not the same anymore. You know, no, there is no way you are the same. So, finding a tribe that has gone through some similar experience, not necessarily the same country, but you know, that crossing cultures and crossing borders and being stretched to the max, you know, and in going through hardships and, you know, just, yeah, learning lessons, you know, and finding someone who's actually you can relate to, but also who has their stories as well to share with you that it's super important.

Allen  

Well, it's interesting with Simone Biles just recently, you know, in the Olympics, you're talking about her mental health issues, and then you Michael Phelps, and other folks that, you know, you think, Oh, these people are champions, they're wonderful people, but they've gone through struggles, and you think about somebody who's, you know, run in very isolated clinic in a given location. And to Andrew's point, you know, think that this is the adventure their life well, not every day is an adventure if it rains for two weeks, and everything and there's insects around and as you know, it's it's, it's, it's still a struggle. And I think the mental health portion of it is one thing. The other thing I'd love to ask you about Giuliana is obviously a lot of our audience is very keen to learn more about telemedicine and given that they're in a remote setting, you know, having the ability to reach out to somebody about telemedicine. So, I'd love your perspective on some of the telemedicine improvements that you might have seen from when you went 20 years ago, which there was no such thing to now the ability for somebody to reach across and have that type of assistance.

Juliana  

Telemedicine is a game changer. So yes, actually 2006 I remember we tried setting up a program for the clinic to actually collaborate with, you know, hospitals in the US in actually discussing cases. And we had to give up just because, you know, internet was really irregular and we had so many issues, it was so hard. Fast forward, you know, 2021 During this pandemic, we had a jump, right. So the market was already ripe. But now it is incredible, the advancements in telemedicine. So, yes, I, I am always in favour of actually, when you move somewhere, exploring your options in that place. So talk to locals, talk to other expats to find out what are the resources you have locally. And sometimes you have excellent resources and you know, it's just a bonus to be able to connect with those with our community healthcare professionals. However, there are places where that is not the case. And, you know, depending on what you have, if you already are being treated, you know, long term with a physician that you're really close to, there is a relationship there, you don't want to leave behind, you know, telemedicine is just gold. You can actually, you know, move and continue that relationship. You know, and I think everyone wins in this right? Especially your health if you can maintain there's continuity in the treatment.

Allen  

So a couple things that, you know, we focused a bit on medical, we've talked about the importance of evacuation coverage, I do want to go into an area that I found was an issue when I visited expats around the world is dental. There was a lot of concern about the cleaning of the machinery, you don't want to get hepatitis from a local dental clinic, there was also issues with eye injuries, you know, you want you know, there's so, you know, I think it's also important for people to realize how they want to take care of their dental and their eye health. What I know over the years, this has gotten better, but I used to talk to a lot of expats and they're like, I wouldn't even get a dental cleaning in a lot of locations because I don't have the the confidence that the cleaning, the machinery to the level that I want. I don't want to get hepatitis or some other thing. And it is your feeling that things have come forward enough and I know the major cities maybe but maybe in the remote spots. It's difficult, isn't it to get some of this specialized care you might get in these these areas.

Juliana  

It can be and I think dental is a great example of you know, looking back to what I was talking about planning. Don't quote me on this. I haven't looked at the stats in a while but I if I'm not wrong, if I'm not mistaken. I think dental emergencies is one of the main causes of eventually expats having to come back to receive, you know, medical treatment back in the home country. So in sometimes really preventable, you know, things. So, going to the dentist before you go, you know, you go overseas, it pays off. It's really, really smart. It's a smart thing to do. As far as trusting where you're being treated, of course, that will depend on where you are. You're right rural areas, it can be very challenging. Again, you know, talking to fellow expats, where you are, they tend to know really good resources, right. If not in your region, sometimes in the capital of that country. They have more resources, you know, and, and that is the case that it's worth getting in a car, or a plane, you know, and taking the time to go to where the resources, you know, and not taking a risk. If you're not comfortable with the risk, you know, absolutely, you know, find find a plan B. Or Plan A, that would be, yeah,

Allen  

Plan A is always good, but it's always good to have a plan B, and C. It's always good, especially in the global environment. So, we've asked all of our guests of the podcast over our first year here, a question that we'd love to get your answer on is, you know, you've you've obviously varied experiences for our Nomad family. What is one overlooked person, place or experience, you would suggest that our listeners discover, we'd love to get your perspective on that.

Juliana  

I would highly recommend, I already mentioning or mentioned again, Ruth Van Reken's book, Third Culture kids, for families, but absolutely for everyone, single, married with kids, without kids. Your local travel medicine clinic, if you don't even know where it is, find out and go there, check it out, and go before you're actually planning to go on a trip. So that when you decide to go, you're ready to go, you have all your shots, and you are, you know, smart, smarter

Allen  

Fantastic. And given that this is a bit of a family episode, I'd like to ask the same question of Andrew. Given that he's travelled so many locations together with you and Juliana, what could you share one overlooked person, place or experience you would suggest our listeners discover?

Juliana  

Wow, I am usually the one asking that of our hosts so it's, you know, caught me off guard Alan. So let's say my mind immediately went to the beaches of Thailand and the food there. You know that mango sticky rice, it may not be overlooked by so many people, but for others, Thailand may not be on your list of places to go. It may be a thing of oh, I gravitate toward the South America or Europe. If it's not on your map, get to Chiang Mai. Get out of Bangkok and go down to the beaches. Sure enjoy Bangkok go to the night market in Chiang Mai and things like that. But get to Thailand at some point. It's the kids have great memories of it as well, and eat their food. Amazing food.

Andrew  

Yes.

Allen  

Yeah. I very much concur. I was lucky enough to spend some time in Thailand. And I don't think you can have a bad meal there. Unless you're really searching for one. I mean, it's fantastic. Whether it's a small, you know, restaurant or somewhere in a market. Marvelous call out on that. So it's, it was great having you with us today, Juliana. We learned a lot. This is where I go back to Andrew and ask what did he learn today? And given that he said many, many years of learnings from you this this might be a hard one. Also, because I'm sure you you've helped keep him healthy and safe. And we appreciate that dearly. Andrew, what did you learn today?
  

I admire this guest so much. So it's one of those things. You know, I want to ask you though, that normal question that I usually come in here as well, I learned that I guess I didn't really learn this but I did see my my appreciation for her. One her intellect and her passion for making sure people are cared for. But I want to point out the best way to reach her is LinkedIn. If somebody wants to get in touch with you, this will be in the show notes. But she is a rather studious and very focused so for social network. It would be LinkedIn right, Juliana.

Juliana  

That's correct. Studious is a very fine word.

Allen  

I would say that that was touching at the beginning there, and then very clinical at the end. So worked perfectly through it through a doctor there. And but Juliana, we are very happy every day to have you on somebody we can talk to and keep us all safe. And certainly I do recommend to folks out there if they have questions, obviously, there's a difference between giving medical advice, which we will not do here to giving people good tips to keep themselves safe. Because we want all of you out there to be safe and prepared. thing. So thanks. Thanks again, what I learned, and I really, you right, I really appreciate your prayers, you know, the preparation, the immunizations, and, and like the little call out because I do use CBD and I could just see myself in a bad situation that you'd be like, I had no idea. And you know, we've seen that and also the call on a mental health. I think there's a huge learning out there. And I cannot command and I know we all do some mobiles. And people like Michael Phelps and others who have come forward not just in the athletic community but but all over. So, tremendous job today. So we do want to remind our audience that The New Nomad is not just a podcast, it's community of people, ideas and spirit helping you take advantage of that location, independent lifestyle. We want to keep you safe and happy. And please report back to us some of those exciting journeys. Thanks again and look forward to hearing from you next week.

Protecting your Health with Dr. Juliana Jernigan, MD, MPH, MBA, DTM&H | TNN33

About the Guest

Dr. Juliana Jernigan, MD

As a co-founder and Chief Medical Officer of Insured Nomads, Juliana Jernigan has worked/lived across 5 continents and has gathered valuable experience in pursuit of a better world for everyone. Along with being a medical doctor, she received her MBA and MPH from University of Alabama Birmingham, and post-graduate studies in travel medicine at University of Liverpool. A wife, mother, medical doctor, this wonder woman has touched the lives of many people. She now lives between Philadelphia, PA, USA and the moon.