Episode #
059

Get the best coach, be the best coach with Lauren Tickner | TNN59

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Episode Summary

The business environment continuously grows in complexity and at a rapid pace and the personal benefits of coaching are as wide-ranging as the individuals involved. Coaching provides an invaluable space for personal development. It can unlock some amazing benefits for your company like boosting employee morale, retention rates, and even performance. With strong coaches amongst your leadership team and beyond, you can remain competitive in today’s marketplace and future-proof your company.

Lauren Tickner, an exemplary business coach and entrepreneur, joins our hosts, Andrew Jernigan and Allen Koski in this episode of The New Nomad. As the owner of Impact School, a company that is committed to helping entrepreneurs work on systems to get their time back, reach more people, and scale without guesswork. Lauren shares her expertise and experience in coaching and scaling businesses, challenging the audience to personal improvement. Tune in to The New Nomad podcast and be ready for the gold nuggets throughout the show.

From the episode

What You'll Learn

  • Good coach, bad coach
  • Great coaching is all about the empowerment
  • Growth in the unexpected

Timestamps

[1:55] Good coach, bad coach

[10:25] Great players want great coaching

[17:48] Why referrals are important

[21:15] Repetition triggers results

[28:47] Great coaching is all about the empowerment

[31:15] Growth in the unexpected

Show Transcript

Allen  

Hello and welcome to The New Nomad podcast. Lauren Tickner will join us today. Lauren, an incredible business coach, runs Impact School's going to share with us some of her insights today. But Andrew, you and I have over the years talked about coaching. Now great coaches coach people to higher levels, a lot of times great coaches come from a tree of other great coaches. And we all make progress through that tree. Why don't you share a little bit about what you think makes a great coach and maybe an example of a great coach that you've come across, will ask very similar question of Lauren when we bring her into the conversation.

Andrew  

Yeah, welcome, everybody. Hi, Andrew here, it's a pleasure to have you all listening again this time on The New Nomad. You know, this is a privilege because with the business success that Lauren has seen, the insights that she usually shares really triggers some good action points for me. You know, when I reflect back on your question, Allen, of the coach, I take a trip back in time to high school basketball, and Coach Johnson in running suicides up and down that basketball court. But he was both motivational but critical in a manner that would get results, and change what needed to happen. And but yet, likeable enough, in his, in his critique, in his way of pointing out what you did wrong, always gave consequences for what for those mistakes and said, Look, no, you got to face consequences of all that you just messed up in that last play, whether it's sitting the bench or if it's a practice game, you're running, you're doing whatever. But a good coach, I think is able to see the things you don't see that slight arm movement, that needs to be adjusted to be able to make that shot. That lack of fitness that needs to be made up and running some laps, those other things that a coach can see where you can't see. And I think another thing is that a coach can say what's needed to be said when no one else has been given permission to say that. What do you think Allen? You've coached quite a bit. You're a natural coach and your tennis work and these days.

Allen  

You know, you hit the nail on the head on good coaching. I'll take it from a different approach. Before we bring Lauren, you can tell what a bad coach is too and the thing about it is a bad coach demoralizes a team, rips them down, doesn't establish the connection that you mentioned. And also, a lot of times you wonder if that coach actually has your best interest in mind. Great coaches have the best interest of the people they're working with in their mind. And you can tell even when they're being difficult or unkind. They're doing it because they want you to be better, and raise the bar. So yeah, I learned almost as much from the bad coaches of where not to go, as you do with the good coaches where you want everybody to feel they make a contribution. And sometimes people have that one talent. That makes a huge difference. Andrew, I see you want to add one thing there?

Andrew  

Yes, you hit on something, the bad coaches, that I think there's so much buzz about, oh, I'm not gonna hire a coach, because there's so many people out there who bought a certificate and they say they're coaching. So it's one of those things of there's some great coaches, don't throw everybody out and think I'm not gonna get a coach. I'm not gonna let someone speak into my life, even though you need it. Yeah, I think that's a vital point as we start out today, because, you know, a team needs a coach, a company needs a version of a coach as I lean on today. And that's This is a critical point, I believe, as many people on social channels are bashing the value of a coach. There is so much value in having that leader.

Allen  

Well, you know, Lauren, let’s bring you into the conversation, there's quite a preamble by Allen and Andrew with a lot of different areas there. You spend a lot of time with coaching and coaches, good, bad I would love first off a little bit of your background and how you built this online coaching platform but also your take on what you see and that you feel great good coaches do, what you do and what other things that people should avoid as they move forward and try to get better.

Lauren  

Yeah, totally. I think one of the things that you said was interesting about how people can buy a certification and then just suddenly call themselves a coach. So what I see is that the great coaches, whether it's in sport and fitness, like you guys were discussing, or whether it's business, or social media, or performance, or relationships, or parenting, or anything in between, ultimately, is that they've been there and done it. And they have all the battle wounds and scars. So whether it has been them themselves, or their experience in business, or someone close to them has gone through that thing, that's where I always see they've kind of gone through to the other side and lived to tell the tale. And I feel that great coaches are the ones who have done that, and who now are so passionate about solving that particular problem because it makes such a big impact on their lives and the lives of the people around them. That then they will do whatever it takes to be able to serve their clients to the best degree possible. And they don't get emotionally attached to the vehicle in which they serve those clients. Because they're aware that things change, tech changes, the ability to go fully online is now definitely a thing. And so they just live for the clients. And they want to know the ideal client of theirs better than anyone else. And they focus on scaling intimacy, too. And so the way that I see people doing that, and that we support them, where there's helping them turn that knowledge that's in their head into frameworks so that those frameworks can be applied to each individual client. And then they can build a team around those frameworks so that it can grow just beyond them. So there's a lot to it. But the cool thing is that this is really something which I feel people understand the value of coaching now. And it's interesting, because I would say about 90% of people that come to us at Impact School, they have been burned by a coach before. And so it's difficult, because, yeah, there are a lot of people out there who, unfortunately, whatever areas, and they don't necessarily get results. And so that's why for example, we actually guarantee client results like we have a guarantee that we'll work with our clients until they make their investment back. And that's also another thing that I say to my clients is like, Hey, guys, if you back yourself, which they should, um, which pretty much all of our clients actually get to that level where they feel confident to do it, give a guarantee. And you make sure that you're not really one of those client, those coaches that is in there doing the shady stuff.

Andrew  

Interesting, if a coach of athletics, had a guarantee that you will make it you will get the athletic scholarship or you will make it to the Olympics. 

Lauren

Yeah. 

Andrew

That's quite a guarantee. I'm thinking, a friend of mine, who's a lawyer who has a, a coach for his firm, and another friend who's actually an owner of a roofing company, that he pays his coaching firm, to move his business forward. I think that those who listen to counsel, wise counsel, are wise. I was looking for another word there, but it just wasn't coming. What do you think? Do people if people don't listen to you? Are they gonna get to the next stage?

Lauren  

Yeah, no, this is a great, this is a really, really great point. And that's why we've worked closely with lawyers on this as well, to make sure that the way in which we do it is going to be, you know, the most important thing is actually only enrolling plans that you can help. So the first thing that I love about having a guarantee is that it forces you to be selective about who you work with. And then because you have the guarantee, you can charge a higher price point, and then, therefore, bring in fewer clients while still making the same amount of revenue. And I would argue considerably more profits because these are better clients. And thus, they then end up engaging on all your stuff on social media, sharing it bringing in referrals. So there's a really nice, positive ripple effect. But to your point, yeah, I mean, if you have a guarantee, you've got to be able to get them the results. So then how do you actually measure whether or not they're showing up or not? Well, the first thing is actually saying, okay, each month, you have to do at least the bare minimum these things, and so on and so forth. And then that's how we're able to ensure that we can offer that guarantee. But frankly, people don't typically join a high ticket coaching program and pay a lot of money and then just don't do it. It's happened to us, I would honestly be able to count that probably on my two hands, how many times that's happened. And it's usually because compared to their monthly income, the amount that they had invested was very, very small because they were like bigger corporate clients. And so at the end of the day, they're most likely just spending money because their finance department has given them the budget they have to spend. And if they don't spend it, then they don't get the support again, right. So they don't really care and they're not going to come back to us and say hey, we need our money back because tadada

Allen  

But you hit upon something there that I was just thinking about as people make greater investments in themselves tend to have a greater upside anyways. Right? I mean, it's somebody who comes to you for coaching is somebody who wants to succeed. People that don't come for coaching, are probably very comfortable in whatever their situation is, even if it's not a great one. And this is the thing about, you know, coming for a coach is actually great players want great coaching, more than average players want great coaching. Because it's all right. So I'd love your comment on the type of people that come to you must be highly motivated. And let's say this stuff, I'm good. But I like to be good to great.

Lauren 

Yeah, that's good. That's interesting as well because that's why we changed a large part of our sales process since our last podcast that we did together. So before, what we were doing is we were doing a lot, a lot, a lot of following up and then getting them on a call to see if it could be a good fit, and yada, yada, yada. Whereas now instead, we flipped it on its head, and we just said, Hey, look, here's what it is, if you want an in, go for it. If not, then you can come back in the future. And it's just allowed us it's honestly simplified everything. And that's been one of my big things over the last year has just been a case of a lot of elimination, and taking, you know, dose of my own medicine, because that's the type of thing that I tell my team through this type of thing that they all tell our clients to do. And I do that I tell them that myself. And so I think as entrepreneurs, and people who are really, really type A maybe and have a lot of big goals and visions, we can really start to try and do so many things. And so it's just been a case of Yeah, like making sure less is more right now. And it's definitely proving to pay off massively.

Allen  

Well, you mentioned a word and I wrote this time, this is great as scaling intimacy. So So it's more of an individual coaching effort. Talk a little about that. Because that to me, you know, I'm thinking of Andrews example, where you have maybe a team of 12 players. And now they have 12 players, you have the starting five, who you spent a lot of time on, then you have a couple key backups. And then you have the guys at the end of the bench who might be great practice players, or maybe they're coming up in a couple of years. But each one of them there's different insights, different levels of intimacy as the coach carries him along. And I can see in your business, it's the same thing. You must have different levels on that. But I love the way you put that.

Lauren  

Yeah, the interesting thing is that many people when they're first starting out, they are trying to solve for a problem that they don't yet have. And so they try and think, Okay, how can I make this scale? How can I get this to scale, but the fact of the matter is, they haven't even got to the level in which they are an unscaled product, they haven't even got product-market fit. So what I always say is that at the beginning stages, it's not about how can you scale. It's not about how can I bring in so many more clients and build this truly, truly scalable product and this global business that's impacting millions of lives. It's instead, okay, how can you compete against Peloton if you're a fitness coach? They're charging, I don't know how much a month? Or how can you compete with the whoop band or something. But rather than seeing that price point of like 50-100 bucks a month and thinking, well, this isn't even worth my time. How can I even do this? Or seeing these influencers who are literally charging $5 a month for unlimited workouts, and I'm just giving the fitness example here, the first thing that came to my mind, but you have a competitive advantage against them, that you can have one to one interactions with all these people and build such a great relationship and get such amazing results, that that person then tells two people, and then that those two people tell to tell two more each. And so then you're actually able to grow from the inside out. And I believe that referral-based marketing is literally the strongest because the client has pretty much done all the talking for you. And so it's the easiest way to scale. 

So scaling intimacy is where I always encourage my team to look at the outcomes in which we consistently take clients to do, what are the things that we always do? And then how can we build a framework around that, that then we can apply to each person so that they feel like they're the only person in the world who's getting this level of support and this framework, but it's actually something that works for everyone. And then the one-to-one time doesn't need to be training them on how to do something it is instead tweaking them and their unique way of doing things like you gave the example of the sports player, right. So if there's one really great way to score a goal, by the way, I am not a sports person by any means, despite the fact that I'm in the coaching space and so for me, this is kind of a hard example to give, but I'll give it to you. So when I say there's one way to always get the goal, right, and, and so it's like this one way of running, and this person runs here, and that person runs there, and that person runs there. So they need to know the framework as a whole. But then each of them needs to know their individual part of that. So how should they run? How should they apply it to their goals? And that's kind of like the analogy I'm getting to, again, sports is not my thing so that was a really bad one for me. And I would say, I really, something that stuck with me for the longest time was I was listening to this podcast from the guy that created LinkedIn. And he always says, do the unscalable until it breaks. And I think that's just such a simple way to think about it. But if you can keep just doing the things that aren't scalable, then eventually you figure out which things are the ones which like, get the best results. So for me, for example, when I Voice Note people on Instagram, DMS, they'll convert into clients in like 20 minutes, just from a back and forth conversation, even if I've never spoken to them before. That's not scalable. Like, it's just not in a really, really authentic way. But if I want to build something that feels the same way, I can obviously automate it, but it's not true authenticity. And so then you have to decide, okay, at what point do I am I willing to lose the intimacy in favor of scale. And so that's just a decision that you have to make as a business owner. Right. So hopefully, that makes sense.

Allen  

It makes total sense. But also, you mentioned something earlier that ties into this is you've been there and done this, right. So you're helping people avoid mistakes. Because certainly, we learn a lot, often from our mistakes, or coaching errors, or coaches in the past. Give us insights of things to avoid. So what you're saying to me is making complete sense. I mean, I always think it like a coach, not only hands some insights to you, but also gives you kind of a good idea of what to stay away from, like, you know, this is probably a bad practice this, this probably will get you hurt things. And I love your thought on. So we talked a little bit about coaching, but some of the coaching, if somebody goes to a coach, and they're doing X, give us an example of why they should run. I mean, if it's like, how can you tell you've got bad coaching? until far in the future? Is it Are there any tips that you have for people on running for the hills, if they think they got a bad coach?

Lauren  

The most important thing is just to speak to at least three referrals of anyone that you're signing up with. I think that's just the most valuable thing. I've made that mistake before. Last year, I even invested a very high five-figure sum in that coach. And unfortunately, it just, you know, it totally flopped, they ended up pulling the plug on this deal that we were doing, and they just wouldn't give me my money back. And so like these things happen. And so that was my fault because I didn't ask for referrals, right. And so if you end up getting burned, it's your fault, because you didn't look into it, you have to take responsibility and ownership over the actions that you take. It's kind of like if you are for example if you have a terrible team member on your team. And they end up messing up and losing a deal that's worth like $10 million or something. Well, what happened there? Why did they not have the right training? What did you not give them that they needed to be able to be successful with that? Why did you let them stay on the team? Why did you put them in front of the potential client? Right? And so these are the ways that you have to think and so I would say that's the first thing getting at least three referrals and references. And then the second thing is also, we've got just being really pushy when it comes to sales. Why do they need your sales so bad? That's also something that I like to ask. And that's something that I share with my clients is like, if you're being so desperate for the sale, it really turns people off, because they're going to start to question why you need their money so badly right now. And so that's also another thing. 

Lauren  

And I was gonna say because everyone is a coach, everyone is a coach. If you have a team, you are a coach to them. If you have kids, you know you're a coach to them. And so I would say right now I actually spend most of my time to coaching my team versus coaching my clients, because then when I coach my team, they can coach our clients in a much greater capacity in a much better way. And it's funny because I actually did an interview with three, we have three master coaches at Impact School who work with our higher-level clients. We did an interview. It's on YouTube, just on my channel, but it's basically whereby we're discussing what makes a great coach. And it's funny because they were a lot of times just saying, like patience and patience. And that's why I'm a much better strategist, whereas they're much better coaches, I can come up with the frameworks, I can come up with the concepts. I like to teach at scale. But when it comes to actual, like, patience on a one on one, I'm only good and strong that if it's a high level, because if it's like the same stuff, like I said earlier, that I've done on an intimate level, so many times, I'm actually going to start to forget things now, because I've done it so many times, I've had that conversation, literally more than a thousand times, that it's hard for me to be able to actually have it again, without leaving something out, because I felt I already told it to them, you know. So that's why creating frameworks then allows you to have those one-to-one conversations, which are mostly about mindset, honestly. And we even called mindset mental programming now, because people don't want to hear mindset, right? So we talk about how we're going to help them program their mind. And it becomes much more of a, I guess, like a sexy hook, you know, to ensure that they know that it's something that's important.

Andrew  

Right? Because it's it we have to be able to speak to generate change. So if you're saying the same thing over and over, it no longer gets heard. Yeah. So you have to say it in different ways use different words. And over time, I've often asked people can you say that again just using different words? 

Lauren  

Totally. Oh, I do that with me all the time. Yeah, I get them to repeat back to me like, okay, so what is it that we're doing? Okay, so when are we going to do that by? Okay, so from what I said, What did you understand? I do it every time like on every call three times.

Andrew  

Right? Because our minds get so distracted, we go into while someone is saying something. We've had all these other things come in our mind from, oh, I should go do this afternoon, or I just got a notification or should I have another sip of coffee, or all these other things, it just entered our mind while something important was being said. So it stands to reason that things have to be said repeatedly for us to hear it. Because our minds are capable of so much more than we hold them to account to. All of us are, are capable of so much more than then we're, we're held to accomplish. And so as we communicate with others, I think it's so valuable to realize that we have to read between the lines and realize that we need, say the can between those lines in new ways. And not to say, Oh, I told you that last Thursday. Yeah. Well, yes. But we do need to communicate it multiple times in different ways. So that when it's heard the next time, it'll actually trigger results, I believe.

Lauren  

Okay, so I have a question for you, then, both of you. I'm flipping on its head. What has been your most powerful coaching experience that you've had in business, like a high level?

Allen  

So I'll take a first crack at this. Alright, so I ran a sales organization. And I had to move to allow my people to come forward into what we call second chair, which is, when you move from when you would go to a finals meeting, you'd be the first chair, you're the person who's answering all the questions, running the whole process, etc. To when you become a coach, you no longer can be the first chair, you're the person working behind the scenes, helping them prepare the meetings. But when the meeting happens, they are, they're running it, it's their show, you can be there for support, counsel, feedback, etc. But when you make move to the secretary, and then they know you've made that move, said, you know, training is over, you've seen how I do it. But everybody does things a little differently. I'm here to support you. I'll work with you on the front end. But when we go to that meeting, they're going to address the questions to you, the presentation is going to be yours. And what I love about that is that's the kind of releasing and you've given them some insights and you've been there before but people can only learn sometimes from their own mistakes, but then you give them honest feedback. So that's my example of where I always felt good is when you really say to somebody I'm taking second chair now because I have enough confidence that you can do a wonderful job without any net underneath so to speak. What about you Andrew?

Andrew  

You know, I was shocked when I started using a coach in my life quite a few years back that I didn't really get answers. I got questions and silence and I had to come up with those answers. And so the biggest takeaway from me from that is that and I really value this coach and mentor in my life that was able to ask the question and listen to the answer and realize if I actually answered it, or avoided it with an answer. And so I think that the best coach I've had was able to hear beyond the, the fake answer. To get to the response that was needed. They're asking more and more questions, and not being perturbed by those questions. Really engaging with it getting, getting the depth that was intended. Through those thought-provoking questions. I'll have a session this week. And this one, you know, this wonderful Swedish coach is just guiding me through a process for needed change. And I'm looking forward to it because I know that a question will be asked, and I'm accountable for the action that's required to meet that posed challenge. 

Allen  

So Lauren, you just asked us a question. I'd love your answer on this. But also, I think you did something really powerful there. A lot of times coaching is through asking people a question and having them come to the conclusion. You as a coach had an idea of where you're, the answer may be right, but it's, it leads people to insights would love your comment, your thought on your own question, and then also your use of questioning was awesome. And I assume that that's a technique?

Lauren  

Well, here's the thing, I thought your way of answering it, Allen, was really interesting because you gave a different answer than I was expecting and that's also the other powerful way. The other powerful thing about coaching because it can actually start to get you to look at your answers that you give from another angle. So for example, your answer was about when you had coached someone to get them to the outcome in which they were then able to go and lead this meeting by themselves. And that was interesting. I wasn't expecting you to say that. And so now I'm thinking, Hmm, firstly, think about all the clients, you know, because that, for me isn't a normal thing to think about, like all of the results in which our coaching has served people within my team, because that's what we do all day. Whereas when I think about myself, and the most powerful coaching experiences that I have had have been just deep internal shifts in my mindset, which have made me see myself in a totally different way. And so I've got one that I'll share in a moment, which was really, really profound. However, on that same podcast episode that I was discussing just a moment ago, with the three master coaches from Empire school, we discussed this one topic, which was really important. And probably like you guys, when you were first starting out, I remember when I'd be working with my team a few years ago. And I'd be like, Okay, so we're going to do this, this and this. And then they'd share their thoughts. And we'd strategize and brainstorm together. And then like, this was the decision, and then that was it. And then this is how you do it. And I would tell them, This is how to do it. And it would be more like me sharing the steps. Whereas what we were discussing on our podcast is like, well, actually, true coaching is ultimately about empowering the person which you're talking to whether they're on your team, or whether they're a client, to actually have the aha moment from themselves rather than you telling them the aha moment. Because when someone has that aha moment, and it hits deep inside somewhat deeper than they felt before, then it stays with them. And I actually empowers them to become that person that they need to be to achieve that thing. 

So one that happened for me, in the past, I would say, in the past eight months, so I was working, funnily enough with a branding coach. And so she was guiding me through various different things when it came to branding and how to position myself against my company, and how my coaches should position themselves in the spotlight because like, my whole thing is like, I don't really want to necessarily be seen as a coach, I want to be seen as someone that owns a coaching company. And so all of our PR has historically been around me and my experience, etc. Because I this was my first business when I was 17. Right? And that was how I started but in fitness. And so basically what I realized is that through working with her even though she was helping me on branding and storytelling and everything I had to go so deep on all that stuff that I realized for the longest time, I was doubting my abilities as a leader to lead a company of the size in which Impact School is growing towards. And I realized, oh, okay, the reason being is because while I'm a very logical person, I didn't feel like I had the structure and systems around me to facilitate this as a fully remote team. And so that led to me making some big investments, like I discussed before, like, you know, and unfortunately, I made that investment out of desperation, which ended up costing me to lose almost 100k, just like that. And so that was disappointing. But the biggest thing for me is that through her coaching me on something totally unrelated, it made me realize something inside of myself, that then made me realize that something inside of my company needed to change. But that could only happen if the internal shift in my mind was ready to take on the structural change that was happening internally. And also me hiring people who are way more experienced than me, who were like, twice my age, and also being able to let go of that element of control. So that was interesting, and also very, very, very unexpected. And I think sometimes we can find growth in things where we really just least expect it if we let it in.

Allen  

You know, this has been extremely enlightening to me because I love questioning and coaching is a great area on this. So as people listening to this podcast, could you share with them where they could find more about impact school about yourself, I know you've got a podcast, etc. Because I think that if somebody listens to this, we all need coaching, we all need to get better. What you're bringing to people is extremely important. Please share where they can track you down. Of course, we'll put this in our show notes, etc.

Lauren  

Yeah, for sure. Impact School podcast, that's probably the best way Impact School podcast for the Americans. So funny, it always happens. I say podcasts and people don't know what I'm saying. So yeah, those who just type Impact School in and you'll find it IMPACT and then SCHOOL like high school, you know. And the reason being is because, see, I was studying on the UK is number one business degree. But then my professors had never had their own business. So that's why I Impact School, I'm just so committed to actually ensuring that the people and the clients that we're serving, they are people that have been there and done it, they've, as I said, before, they've been on the battleground, they have the scars, and the wounds to show for it. And I really think that I am seeing this like because we work with so many, so many people, I am just truly seeing the shift and this change. And what's been the most fascinating is that many people who have perhaps had a more safe, even business of their own, maybe they were doing something in IT or tech or some type of like management consulting, I'm actually seeing a lot of them shift into the type of coaching that they actually care about, like I just had this one client join this morning. And she has been doing UI/UX design for these massive, massive companies. She'd been making a very, very big salary, doing her own business with many contractors and such. But now she wants to do branding coaching. And that's because she's passionate about that. And I think that's cool, because people are seeing that they can make really great money, but also do the thing that they actually care about while living with so much more fulfilment in what they're doing. You know, and I would say that's more powerful than just the marginal gain of a bit of extra cash.

Allen  

Well, that's a great way to summarize. So Andrew, take us out, what's your thoughts on today's conversation?

Andrew  

You know, with today's climate for everyone, having a deeper desire to shift how they live their life, where they live their life, how they can generate income, I believe that many people need someone walking alongside them to do so. They may have been doing this like myself, you we both been working remotely for many years. And in traveling the world to doing to do so but they want to take it up a notch. And I believe it's time that people realize that they can't do it alone. Leaders and successful people can't do it alone. And oftentimes even though they have a team of people that are working in their business with them that's different than having someone that they can call from the outside and say okay, we're at the sales cap. What can we do to time x that? That's the time I think that's it As people are listening to this, they need to find someone within their specialty or within their set to, to take their game to the next level. And so wherever you are in the world today, I know that this episode has been another one that has challenged you for personal improvement. We have a lot of great people on and so tune in again next week. Share this episode on your social media. Check out Lauren in the links below, or the Impact School, Impact School podcast etc. And until next time, everyone. Safe travels. And thanks for joining us on The New Nomad.

Get the best coach, be the best coach with Lauren Tickner | TNN59

About the Guest

Lauren Tickner

With multiple business endeavors at just the age of 23, Tickner has risen quickly to become one of the UK’s most successful and respected entrepreneurs in the online space. Today, Lauren’s main source of income is Impact School, her online coaching and consulting company where she now has more than 40 people employed, including a COO, Sales Director, Marketing Strategist, and an entire tech team. She is focused today on Impact School as well as her new software company, whereby she is building software that will empower users to build their own online courses and coaching programs.